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The Recruiting Process

The Application/Recruiting Process

1) Register with the NCAA

•    Register with the NCAA Eligibility Center
•    Click HERE for detailed instructions on how to register

•    Find your high school's list of approved courses using code 050725 to ensure you are taking the right ones

3) Take the SAT or ACT
•    Send scores to NCAA using code 9999
•    While the NCAA may be test-optional for 2023-24 applicants, individual schools vary
•    High test scores can boost low GPAs in NCAA

4) Complete your college applications
 
5) Apply and be accepted to an NCAA SCHOOL
 
6) Complete the FAFSA - the sooner you fill this out the better. 
 
7) Request Amateurism Certification
•    Complete all questions & pay fee
•    To receive certification, you must be on DI or DII Institutional Request List
 
8) Send final documents
•    Final official transcript
•    Proof of graduation
 
9) You get to sign your acceptance letter
 

Account Types

Type 1) Free Profile: For students interested in Division III schools or who are not sure in which division they would like to compete. This account can transition to the second type at any time. Do not create a new account to request certification. Students can create this profile as early as sophomore year. 

Type 2) Paid Certification Account: Students create and pay for this account, or transition their free NCAA profile by upgrading to a paid certification account. They complete all the tasks to apply for an 'amateurism certification' by the NCAA. College-bound student-athletes who meet Division I and II academic and amateurism requirements receive amateurism certification. Students must have a complete Certification Account in order to take official visits (paid for by the school) or to sign a National Letter of Intent (NLI). The fee for domestic students is $100. 

The NCAA does not perform academic certifications for Division III-bound student-athletes. Each Division III school determines its own eligibility for admission, financial aid, and competition.

NCAA Testing Information

  • ACT/SAT are superscored
  • The application for 2023-24 is test-optional
  • A sliding scale is used to assess GPA eligibility. This means that a student with a low test score needs a higher GPA to be eligible. Click HERE for Division I sliding scale. Click HERE for Division II sliding scale
  • More information regarding the impact of COVID-19 and test scores can be found at HERE
 

Proactive Student Actions

  • Contact the recruiting coach to let them know you are interested in the school
  • Let the recruiting coach know when you will be on campus to see if you can schedule an unofficial visit
  • Send the recruiting coach information about your sports performance
  • Share your NCAA ID number with recruiting coaches (this is located in the top-right corner of your EC account)

Recruiting Vocabulary

Amateurism certification: The NCAA process that evaluates prospective student-athletes to ensure they meet Division I and II amateur requirements.
 
College Visit: There are two types of college visits.
Official College Visit: (paid for by the college) before an official visit to a Division I or II school, students must send their high school transcript to the NCAA and register for a Paid Certification Account with the NCAA Eligibility Center.
Unofficial College Visit: (paid for by the student or legal guardians) there isn’t a limit on the number of unofficial visits a student may make after the first permissible date in each sport. Students should check recruiting shutdowns and dead periods when scheduling visits if they want to interact with coaches. 
 
Division I Alternative standards
Early Academic Qualifier: This term refers to high school students who meet specific criteria after six semesters of high school.
Qualifier: The term for prospective student-athletes who meet qualifier standards and may practice, compete, and receive an athletic scholarship during freshman year.
Academic Redshirt: The term for prospective student-athletes who do not necessarily meet academic criteria but may practice and receive an athletics scholarship, may not compete, and must meet academic requirements during freshman year.
Nonqualifier:Students who will not be able to practice, compete, or receive an athletics scholarship during freshman year.
 
Division II Alternative Standards
Early Academic Qualifier: This term refers to high school students who meet specific criteria after six semesters of high school.
Qualifier: The term for prospective student-athletes who meet qualifier standards and may practice, compete, and receive an athletic scholarship during freshman year.
Partial Qualifier: The term for prospective student-athletes who may practice and receive an athletics scholarship but may not compete during freshman year.
 
Division III Standards: Each Division III school determines its own eligibility for admission, financial aid, and competition.
 
Institutional Request List (IRL): A list of college-bound student-athletes an NCAA Division I or II school is interested in recruiting
 
Name, Image, Likeness (NIL): Recent reforms in both the NAIA and NCAA allow student-athletes to be compensated for use of their name, image, and likeness.
 
National Letter of Intent (NLI): signing an NLI commits the student to attending a specific Division I or II school for one academic year. This voluntary signature ends the recruiting process.
 
NAIA: Stands for the National Association of Intercollegiate Athletes. This association of small North American colleges and universities evaluates student eligibility to receive athletic financial aid and compete in the 27 national championships it sponsors.
 
NCAA: Stands for the National Collegiate Athletic Association. This nonprofit organization regulates student athletics in American, Canadian, and Puerto Rican schools. It adopts and enforces rules for categorizing teams into competitive divisions, upper and lower limits for athletic scholarships, and creates an equitable recruiting environment.
 
NCAA core courses requirements: the minimum course requirements for college-bound student-athletes. There is some flexibility for 2021-22 and 2022-23 enrollment due to COVID-19.
 
NCAA Eligibility Center: A part of the NCAA that evaluates and certifies that college-bound student-athletes are eligible to compete at Division I and II schools.
 
NCAA Eligibility Center account types: See the Recruiting Process tab.
 
NCAA ID: this is an identification number unique to the NCAA that is created for you once you create an Eligibility Center account. Division I and II coaches use this number to add students to their Institutional Request List during recruiting.
 
Recruiting calendar: Since NCAA member schools limit recruiting to certain periods during the year, each sport has a schedule of when a coach can initiate contact (Contact Period), can initiate limited contact (Quiet Period), and can not initiate contact (Dead Period) with a prospective student-athlete.
 

FAQs

Frequently Asked Questions

1. What happens if I become injured and can't play?
Answer: The coach and the athletic department determine whether a student will retain an athletic scholarship when injured.
2. How much time do student-athletes commit to their sport and sport-related activities?
Answer: Being a student-athlete is like having a part-time job. Typically students spend 30-40 hours per week practicing, playing, fundraising, and other activities.
 

Learn more!